Vampyre Library Book Club

I am honored that my novel Vampires of the Scarlet Order has been picked to be the featured selection in November for the Vampyre Library Book Club hosted by Boutique du Vampyre in New Orleans. The club is hosted on Facebook and you can join at: https://www.facebook.com/groups/663608917753704. Throughout the month, I’ll be sharing some background about the novel in the Facebook group. On Sunday, November 29, Vampyre Librarian Steven Foley will interview me about the novel live and you’ll have an opportunity to ask questions. You’ll also be entered in a drawing to win some cool prizes.

In Vampires of the Scarlet Order, a new generation of vampires embarks on a quest to save humanity.

Opening a forgotten crypt during a military exercise, Dr. Jane Heckman is made a vampire and begins a journey to unlock the secret origins of her new kindred.

Elsewhere, solitary vampire Marcella DuBois emerges from the shadows and uncovers a government plot to create vampire-like super soldiers.

Daniel McKee, a vampire working as an astronomer, moves to a new town where he’s adopted by a family, only to have government agents strip those he loves away from him.

All three vampires discover the government is dabbling in technologies so advanced they’ll tap into realms and dimensions they don’t understand. To save humans and vampires alike, Jane, Marcella, and Daniel must seek out the legendary master vampire Desmond, Lord Draco and encourage him to resurrect his band of mercenaries, the Scarlet Order.

If you don’t have the book yet, Boutique du Vampyre has two very tempting offers to sink your teeth into. The first is a book bag which comes with a copy of Vampires of the Scarlet Order which includes a signed book plate, plus a copy of New Orleans Vampires History and Legend by Marita Woywod Crandle, a link to her short story, “The Paris of the South,” and a Boutique du Vampyre book bag. You can order this at: https://feelthebite.com/collections/vampire-library-books-for-sale/products/david-lee-summers-book-box-and-book-bag

Another tempting option, is to pick up a book box. The book box come with a signed copy of Vampires of the Scarlet Order, a Boutique du Vampyre book bag, an exclusive selection of goodies related to the storyline, and a link to the short story by Marita Woywod Crandle, The Paris of the South. You can get this at: https://feelthebite.com/collections/vampire-library-books-for-sale/products/david-lee-summers-book-box-and-book-bag?variant=36707114057896.

I am truly honored for my novel to be selected for the Vampyre Library Book Club. Previous novels that have been featured have included Dracul by Dacre Stoker and J.D. Barker, The Casquette Girls by Alys Arden, and Dead Until Dark by Charlaine Harris.

As for the giveaways, I can tell you that Boutique du Vampyre will have something fun and unique. I plan to give away a set of metal bookmarks. Each one features one of the characters from the novel plus a quote by them. These make great, permanent book marks to mark your favorite vampire novel. What’s more, my wife made one of her special crochet Nosferatus. If you’ve read the novel, you know that the movie Nosferatu was a major inspiration for me. You can see her Nosferatu in the image of me signing book plates for Boutique du Vampyre. So, what are you waiting for? Join the book club today! If you don’t have the novel yet, pick up a book bag or a book box and get reading.

Stamp Collecting

One thing astronomers do is attempt to classify the objects they see by common properties. For example, stars that display similar chemical fingerprints in their spectra will be assigned a certain spectral type. Galaxies can be grouped by shape such as spiral, barred spiral, elliptical, and my favorite, irregular. Here’s a chart from NASA showing the numbers of exoplanets discovered as grouped by size of planet.

Back in my college days, we called this “stamp collecting.” It’s a somewhat derogatory term because it’s not necessarily the most exciting work in astronomy and its significance can be somewhat misleading. A great example is the whole “is Pluto a planet” debate which was sparked by classifying Pluto a dwarf planet. To my mind a “dwarf planet” is just a type of planet. After all, we orbit a dwarf star! (A G2V yellow dwarf main sequence star if you want more of the taxonomy.)

That said, this process of stamp collecting does serve an important purpose. By seeing how many of what types of objects are out in the universe, it helps us understand how the universe evolved. It helps us see patterns that show us how particular objects might have changed. For example, when I mentioned that the sun is a G2V main sequence star, that not only tells me what it is, but gives me some idea where the star is in its life cycle.

We do stamp collecting in the writing world as well. We classify books broadly by subject: science fiction, horror, romance, adventure, etc. We often take these individual classifications down even finer. A science fiction book can be described as hard science fiction, space opera, military science fiction and more. Like stamp collecting in astronomy, this can be an important process. It helps readers find what they want to read. However, it can also get overblown.

It’s become a reality in the publishing industry that an author’s name is a sort of brand, and authors often get classified right along with their books. Mary Smith writes military science fiction while John Jones writes space opera. Some writers even go so far as to pick different pseudonyms each time they explore not just a new genre, but a new subgenre.

I’ve been thinking about this lately in terms of my own writing career. For most of the last decade, I’ve been very focused on my Clockwork Legion steampunk novels. Now, I’m turning my focus more to my Space Pirates’ Legacy series. To my mind, the two series actually have a lot in common. There’s a real space cowboy vibe in the Space Pirates series that echoes the retrofuturism of the steampunk. Of course, this does cause some people to ask if I’ve finished the Clockwork Legion series or won’t do more steampunk. The answer to both is absolutely not. I think I have many more steampunk stories to tell and many of those will feature Ramon, Fatemeh, Larissa, and the rest of the gang. However, I also like telling stories about Captain Firebrandt, Roberts, and Manuel Raton.

For what it’s worth, I classify myself as a writer of fantastic tales with a retrofuturistic vibe. That captures my steampunk, my space cowboys, and even my vampires, especially when I write stories set in a historical context.

If you’re in Tucson, I hope you’ll join me tomorrow, Sunday, February 10 at 3:30pm at Antigone Books for the Tucson Steampunk Society’s book club meeting where I’ve been invited to discuss my fourth Clockwork Legion novel, Owl Riders, which recently was a top-ten finisher in the Predators and Editors Reader’s Poll for best steampunk novel of 2018. Copies of the novel are available at Antigone and if you let us know you haven’t read it yet, we’ll try not to give away too many spoilers. Antigone Books is located at 411 N. 4th Avenue in Tucson. If you can’t make it, the book club posts videos of the meeting that will be shared on their Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/TucsonSteampunkSociety/

Of Comic Cons and Solar Sails

I spent last weekend at Las Cruces Comic Con. Las Cruces is a relatively small town with a modest-sized convention center, so this was a much smaller event than say Phoenix Comicon, Emerald City Comicon, or the granddaddy of the them all: San Diego Comicon. Still, it was a great event with media panels featuring such people as David Zayas who played Sal Moroni in Gotham and Wendy Schaal who voices Francine Smith in American Dad. Lots of people turned out in some really inventive costumes and I was impressed with the photo area the convention organizers set up, which just allowed people to play. Here you see my youngest daughter and a friend having a light saber battle on Tatooine.

Tatooine

For me, it was an unusual convention in that I was the only writer in attendance. The organizers surprised me by giving me a “special appearance” credit in the program guide which was wonderful. Even though I was the only writer in attendance, I still managed quite a bit of networking. I got to speak to several of the artists in Artist’s Alley, had a productive chat with a film production team about possible book trailers, and of course, I got to speak with several friends and fans, some of which I knew from events in Phoenix and Tucson.

Unfortunately, at some point on Saturday I ate something that really disagreed with me. I didn’t sleep well Saturday night and I spent Sunday at the booth with my stomach churning. Still, I managed to have several nice conversations with people and by Monday morning I finally felt better.

Another feature of the weekend was that the DSL line to my house went dead on Friday, so even though I was at a local convention, I had limited internet contact. Fortunately, I still had access to wireless through the Convention Center, but it always amazes me how helpless I suddenly feel when instant communication—something that has come into existence during my adult life—has gone away. Still, I find these experiences helpful because I can channel them into my steampunk novels such as The Brazen Shark where my characters get to discover the novelty of instant, international communication, or my horror novel The Astronomer’s Crypt where my characters are literally and figuratively in the dark through the night and can’t even communicate with each other reliably through a building or across a mountaintop.

The Solar Sea

On Monday night, my older daughter called to say she got to hear Bill Nye the Science Guy give a talk in New Orleans. She said the talk was very inspirational and came right when she needed some encouragement about her recent decision to pursue a mathematics major. In addition to generally encouraging interest in STEM fields, Nye mentioned the Planetary Society’s recent success raising money for their LightSail Project.

In some fun synchronicity, the next day, Lachesis Publishing shared a guest blog post I wrote about creating a reading guide for my novel The Solar Sea. The novel imagines the first voyage to Jupiter and Saturn aboard a solar sail spacecraft. The reading guide presents activities and questions for any classrooms or book clubs who might be interested in reading the novel.

You can read my post at:
http://lachesispublishing.com/?p=6042.

You can learn more about The Solar Sea and download the reading guide at:
http://TheSolarSea.com