Cowboys and Battles

Back when I was editing the anthology Space Horrors, I was trying to entice a very good horror and suspense author to write a story for me. Unfortunately, commitments didn’t allow him to deliver a story, but he did recommend a writer he knew named Gene Mederos. I approached Gene with an invitation and he delivered a creepy tale called “A Touch of Frost.” The characters grabbed me right from the start and I could visualize everything in the story. It should then come as no surprise that Gene teaches film making and film editing at Santa Fe Community College. Ever since that first story, Gene has been one of my go-to authors when I have a new anthology project.

One of the things I most enjoyed about editing Tales of the Talisman were the beautiful story illustrations the artists delivered. Unfortunately, Gene has only written for my anthologies and not for the magazine, so I’ve never had the opportunity to see his stories illustrated…until now that is. Gene has recently turned his great visual sense into creating some beautiful illustrations of his stories. He recently shared them on Facebook and I asked permission to share them with you.

After writing “A Touch of Frost” for Space Horrors, I was delighted to hear he submitted a story to Bryan Thomas Schmidt for Space Battles. Bryan bought Gene’s story “The Thirteens.” In the story, Captain Andromeda Sax and the crew of La Espada investigate a bogey, and come up against Purists, a religious sect dedicated to ridding the galaxy of impurities—like the diverse alien and human species crewing Sax’s ship. The story not only delivered exciting battle scenes but explored issues of diversity and what makes us human. I’m especially pleased that Gene’s story was selected to appear in the best-of collection we assembled from the original anthologies and is now back in print.

Gene has gone on to submit stories for both A Kepler’s Dozen and Kepler’s Cowboys. In the latter story, Gene tackles the subject of how we’ll recognize alien life when we see it, especially when the aliens are very different than the life we know on Earth. He also imagined a rough and tumble frontier world with exotic landscapes that very much captured the essence of the space cowboy subgenre. One of the things that really makes Gene’s work stand out is the attention to detail, such as imagining a genetically engineered creature called a camule, bred to survive in harsh environments, and shown in the illustration above.

Gene and I have stories in both Maximum Velocity: The Best of the Full-Throttle Space Tales and Kepler’s Cowboys. I’ve invited Gene to read one of his stories with me during the “55 Minutes with David Lee Summers” session at Bubonicon which is going on this weekend in Albuquerque. I’ll read my story in the other anthology. If you happen to be there, we’ll be reading in the Carlsbad Room at 10am on Sunday, August 27. I hope you’ll join us for an hour of exciting science fiction.

If you aren’t fortunate enough to be at Bubonicon this weekend, you can learn more about the anthologies by clicking on the links below:

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Accelerating to Maximum Velocity

A little over a year ago, I posted about Tales of the Talisman magazine going on hiatus. At the end of the post, I made a cryptic reference to discussions with Hugo-nominated editor Jennifer Brozek at LepreCon 41 in Phoenix about about a possible book project. Go Full Throttle poster 1 Also at LepreCon was New York Times Bestselling Star Trek author Dayton Ward. As it turns out, the three of us have something in common. We all edited anthologies in the Full-Throttle Space Tales Series published by Flying Pen Press.

This series included six volumes called Space Pirates, Space Sirens, Space Grunts, Space Horrors, Space Tramps, and Space Battles. Unfortunately, Flying Pen Press decided it no longer wanted to devote its energies to fiction and released the rights to the anthologies back to the editors. The plan we hatched at LepreCon was to assemble a “Best of” anthology that included the best stories from each of the books. The thought was we would run a Kickstarter and my company, Hadrosaur Productions, would publish the book. The beautiful artwork illustrating this post is based on a poster idea for the fundraiser by our original cover artist, Laura Givens.

Because each book in the series had a different editor, our plan was to pass the book we edited to the next person in line and they would vote on their favorite stories. This way, everything in the “best of” antho would be vetted by two professional editors. Our only rule was that if we wrote a story in an anthology we were reading, we couldn’t vote for ourselves.

Fast forward to October, when I was at MileHiCon in Denver, Colorado. I ran the idea by Carol Hightshoe, who edited Space Sirens and she was all for it. The surprise at that convention was when David Boop and Peter J. Wacks approached me with an idea. David was instrumental in getting the original series off the ground and had stories in several of the books. Peter was working with Kevin J. Anderson at WordFire Press. Their idea: the editors of the Full-Throttle Space Tales Books should assemble a “Best of” anthology and submit it to WordFire!

Cutting to the chase, we did assemble the anthology and submitted it. WordFire has graciously accepted it. All of the authors selected have been notified and are on board. The editors are now in the process of fine-tuning the anthology and I hope to get the final product to WordFire soon.

The anthology will be called Maximum Velocity: The Best of the Full-Throttle Space Tales. In it, you will find eighteen stories by such folks as C.J. Henderson, Irene Radford, Alan L. Lickiss, Danielle Ackley-McPhail, Jean Johnson, Mike Resnick and Brad R. Torgersen. The collection is edited by Carol Hightshoe, Dayton Ward, Jennifer Brozek, Bryan Thomas Schmidt, and yours truly. I’ll keep everyone posted about the book as we get closer to release time. I hope you’re as excited as I am to go full-throttle again and accelerate to maximum velocity!