Expedition Vega

This past week, I finished reading the second story arc in J-Novel Club’s translation of the Perry Rhodan NEO series. This arc of eight novellas was presented under the collective title, Expedition Vega. When the first arc, Vision Terrania, ended, astronaut Perry Rhodan, who had been to the moon and made first contact with aliens, had established his city Terrania in the Gobi Desert, and had won over the Chinese General Bai Jun who had laid siege to the city. What’s more they had rescued alien Crest de Zoltral from the hands of the Americans. However, the Americans still held technology from Crest’s race, the Arkonides. Expedition Vega opens as Perry Rhodan leads an expedition to recover that technology, so it doesn’t stay in the hands of just one government.

Perry Rhodan NEO: Expedition Vega

Once this recovery mission comes to a conclusion, Perry Rhodan’s people detect a distress signal from the star Vega. Even though Terrania still faces many challenges, Rhodan decides he can’t ignore the signal and puts together a team, which includes Crest’s adopted daughter, the Arkonide Commander Thora, to investigate. Rhodan and his team arrive at Vega and discover a race of reptillian creatures called the Topsidans have taken it upon themselves to conquer the system. The natives of Vega are blue-skinned human-like creatures known as the Ferron. Perry Rhodan and his team are attacked and soon find themselves separated and fighting desperately just to stay alive.

Soon after Perry Rhodan and his team leave the Earth, another alien species turns up. These are the Fantan, who collect anything and everything that happens to grab their interest. It can be something as mundane as a porta-potty to something as crucial as a major bridge or a rescue vehicle. It can even be people. Reginald Bull and Eric Manoli, two of the astronauts who went to the moon with Rhodan and met the Arkonides, are soon collected along with two young mutants. This group eventually teams up with the alien mutant mouse-beaver known as Gucky and begin to plot a way to escape the Fantan

As all of this is going on, humans have learned that Arkonides visited Earth in the distant past and there’s an ancient Arkonide base and ship under the ocean. The humans on Earth hope to use this ancient technology to find a way to get rid of the Fantan who are proving far more than a mere nuisance.

Through the course of these eight novellas, these very disparate plot lines play out and eventually find their way to a common solution. There were many great moments in the series. I enjoyed how Perry kept trying to find a way not only to survive being stranded in the Vega system, but kept looking for ways to bring peace to the system again. One of my favorite moments in this arc was when Reginald, Eric, and Gucky put on the musical The Pirates of Penzance as a way to distract the Fantan and try to escape. Another fun moment came in the novella “A Step Into the Future” by Bernd Perplies, when he introduces a reporter named Dayton Ward, a name strongly associated with Simon and Schuster’s Star Trek novels in the United States.

As it turns out Bernd Perplies has translated several English-language Star Trek novels into German and was a co-author of the Star Trek: Prometheus novels. I wrote to Dayton Ward and asked if he and Perplies knew each other and Ward confirmed they had, in fact, corresponded. I know Dayton because we were co-editors on our own book of exciting space tales called Maximum Velocity. If you’re a fan of exciting space adventure like Germany’s Perry Rhodan series, I suspect you’d enjoy our short story collection. You’ll find stories by people like Mike Resnick, Irene Radford, and C.J. Henderson. There are even stories by Dayton and me. You can pick up a copy at https://www.amazon.com/Maximum-Velocity-Full-Throttle-Space-Tales/dp/1614755299/

I’m sorry to say, I don’t see any forthcoming volumes of Perry Rhodan NEO listed on J-Novel Club’s website. I’m hoping they’re just taking a brief hiatus, otherwise, I’ll have to dust off my German skills to continue into the next 26 story arcs!

My Star Trek

Back in 2007, the current actor playing the Doctor in Doctor Who, David Tennant, appeared alongside one of the classic Doctors, Peter Davison in a short film for charity called “Time Crash.” In the short, Tennant has a moment that’s close to breaking the fourth wall. He glances at Davison with admiration, talks about all the things about him that inspired his interpretation of the character and then declares, “You were my Doctor.” Ever since then Doctor Who fans are fond of proclaiming which Doctor was the one that made them a fan of the series. That Doctor is my Doctor.

It’s possible to do almost the same thing with Star Trek. The show is almost as old and existed in numerous incarnations, much like Doctor Who. What’s more, as I talk to people of different ages, I do find that people do remember different Star Trek series with different amounts of fondness, often related to which one they discovered first and really hooked them. Thanks to having older brothers, I have watched and loved Star Trek as long as I remember, but to some degree, the original series is their Star Trek. For me, the series that hooked me was the one that debuted on Saturday morning TV around the time I started the second grade.

The animated Star Trek produced by Filmation Studios and helmed by D.C. Fontana essentially gave us two more seasons of the original series, completing the original five year mission. What’s more, I’d argue most of the episodes were better than the episodes that appeared in the third live action season. We got to see cool new aliens, such as Arex, a new navigator with three arms and three legs, and a Vendorian shapeshifter with tentacles who no doubt stuck in my mind enough to inspire my Alpha Centaurans when I wrote the first chapter of my novel, The Pirates of Sufiro. We also got to see a return of the tribbles and a return to the planet from the episode “Shore Leave.”

I was pleased to see that someone finally devoted a book to the animated series, Star Trek: The Official Guide to the Animated Series by Aaron Harvey and Rich Schepis with an afterward by Dayton Ward, who co-edited the anthology Maximum Velocity with me. It has nice episode summaries plus behind the scenes information. For instance, I didn’t realize that Lou Scheimer of Filmation had been trying to get rights to do an animated Star Trek since before the original went off the air. What’s more, I learned the animated series the only one to win an Emmy in a non-technical category. It won for “Outstanding Children’s Program” in the second season.

The animated Star Trek often suffers from arguments about the series’ canon. In fact, all canon refers to is the collected body of original work produced by the licensed owners. What people really seem to mean when they argue about “canon” is “the consistent internal history of the show.” It doesn’t help that the series creator, Gene Roddenberry, didn’t want to consider the animated series part of that official history. Despite that, several authors in later series have included references to it. Now, to put this kind of debate into perspective, I have a hard enough time maintaining consistency in a multi-book series that I, alone, create. I can’t imagine being absolutely consistent throughout a series that has lasted over 50 years with multiple creators, where history itself has changed some of the backstory. (We all remember Khan Noonien Singh’s reign in the 1990s, right?) I think the best new creators can do is know what came before, do their best to get it right, and maybe even have a little fun when they find contradictions and anachronisms.

If you haven’t seen the animated series, or it’s been a while, I encourage you to take a look. Bringing Harvey and Schepis’s book along for the journey might just add to your appreciation.

October on the Road

This has proven to be a busy travel month for me. Given that I live in Las Cruces, New Mexico but work at Kitt Peak National Observatory in Arizona, this says a lot. Fortunately, I don’t have to make that commute daily. I have a residence at the observatory and I typically work for six nights, then have nine nights off. My work nights at Kitt Peak average right around 13-14 hours, which is how this works as a full-time job. To make this month’s travel work, I took four nights of vacation time.

My month started on October 1 with a drive from Las Cruces to Tucson for a writing session with a friend. From his house, I drove up to Kitt Peak and worked two nights at the WIYN telescope helping an observer from Indiana University view old galaxies before lots of metals formed to see how they fit into the scheme of galactic evolution. Once those two nights were finished, I drove to San Diego for the Gaslight Steampunk Exposition. On the first morning of the exposition, I had the honor of meeting in person a fellow who already felt like a friend from our online correspondence, Jack Tyler, author of a wonderful steampunk adventure set in Africa called Beyond the Rails and its two sequels.

Jack founded a group called the Scribbler’s Den at a now defunct site called The Steampunk Empire. The group has now been moved to the website Welcome to Steampunk. The group has connected me to many writers around the North America, and even around the world! Not only do we talk about writing, but we’ve produced two anthologies, Den of Antiquity and Denizens of Steam. Also, it’s directly because of connections I made in the group that I learned about the spooky Victorian anthology DeadSteam edited by Bryce Raffle. Jack continues to promote quality Indie books and shares his recommendations every Thursday at his blog: https://blimprider.com/

Another highlight of Gaslight Expo was getting to spend time visiting with Hugo-winning science fiction author Vernor Vinge. I’m a fan of his novels A Fire Upon the Deep and A Deepness in the Sky. We had a panel discussing the Difference Engine and the Analytical Engine designed by Charles Babbage. In addition to writing, Vinge is a retired computer science professor from San Diego State University and I had the privilege of speaking with him about the topic for over an hour outside of the panel as well as the hour on the panel itself.

Of course, the convention as a whole was a delight. William Ball, who works with me at Kitt Peak also traveled to the event. Here you see him in a stylish vest decorated with armillary spheres. I was delighted to attend Hal Astell’s Apocalypse Later festival that showed many indie steampunk short films. Also, I got to see Madeleine Holly-Rosing, creator of The Boston Metaphysical Society comic and related novels. This only touches the surface, but I had a delightful time.

From Gaslight Expo, I drove back to Las Cruces, spent one night at home, then went out to vote on the first day of early voting. After that, my daughter and I picked up the U-Haul she’d packed and drove it to Kansas City where she had a job waiting. This was my first visit to Kansas City, so it was a bit of an adventure finding our way around. We spent our first two nights in a motel, but quickly secured a nice apartment for my daughter. After that, we were able to take a little time to explore the city. Fortunately, Dayton Ward, one of my co-editors on the anthology Maximum Velocity lives in the area and graciously agreed to meet us downtown one day for a visit. Dayton is a talented author in his own right with numerous Star Trek novels under his belt. He took this photo of me and my daughter at the Arabia Steamboat museum.

We’re about halfway through the month’s adventures, so I’ll break it off here. Come back on Monday for more planes, trains, and automobiles as I return to Tucson to work on the DESI spectrograph and then go to Denver to help MileHiCon celebrate its fiftieth anniversary.

Accelerating to Maximum Velocity

A little over a year ago, I posted about Tales of the Talisman magazine going on hiatus. At the end of the post, I made a cryptic reference to discussions with Hugo-nominated editor Jennifer Brozek at LepreCon 41 in Phoenix about about a possible book project. Go Full Throttle poster 1 Also at LepreCon was New York Times Bestselling Star Trek author Dayton Ward. As it turns out, the three of us have something in common. We all edited anthologies in the Full-Throttle Space Tales Series published by Flying Pen Press.

This series included six volumes called Space Pirates, Space Sirens, Space Grunts, Space Horrors, Space Tramps, and Space Battles. Unfortunately, Flying Pen Press decided it no longer wanted to devote its energies to fiction and released the rights to the anthologies back to the editors. The plan we hatched at LepreCon was to assemble a “Best of” anthology that included the best stories from each of the books. The thought was we would run a Kickstarter and my company, Hadrosaur Productions, would publish the book. The beautiful artwork illustrating this post is based on a poster idea for the fundraiser by our original cover artist, Laura Givens.

Because each book in the series had a different editor, our plan was to pass the book we edited to the next person in line and they would vote on their favorite stories. This way, everything in the “best of” antho would be vetted by two professional editors. Our only rule was that if we wrote a story in an anthology we were reading, we couldn’t vote for ourselves.

Fast forward to October, when I was at MileHiCon in Denver, Colorado. I ran the idea by Carol Hightshoe, who edited Space Sirens and she was all for it. The surprise at that convention was when David Boop and Peter J. Wacks approached me with an idea. David was instrumental in getting the original series off the ground and had stories in several of the books. Peter was working with Kevin J. Anderson at WordFire Press. Their idea: the editors of the Full-Throttle Space Tales Books should assemble a “Best of” anthology and submit it to WordFire!

Cutting to the chase, we did assemble the anthology and submitted it. WordFire has graciously accepted it. All of the authors selected have been notified and are on board. The editors are now in the process of fine-tuning the anthology and I hope to get the final product to WordFire soon.

The anthology will be called Maximum Velocity: The Best of the Full-Throttle Space Tales. In it, you will find eighteen stories by such folks as C.J. Henderson, Irene Radford, Alan L. Lickiss, Danielle Ackley-McPhail, Jean Johnson, Mike Resnick and Brad R. Torgersen. The collection is edited by Carol Hightshoe, Dayton Ward, Jennifer Brozek, Bryan Thomas Schmidt, and yours truly. I’ll keep everyone posted about the book as we get closer to release time. I hope you’re as excited as I am to go full-throttle again and accelerate to maximum velocity!