A Stormy Holiday

This year, I spent Thanksgiving on the job at Kitt Peak National Observatory. Because my daughter had the week off, we opted to have our family celebration at home on Monday before my work week began. Over the last dozen years, I’ve spent several Thanksgivings on the job. It’s not necessarily a bad way to spend the holiday. My co-workers and I get to share a turkey dinner on Thanksgiving.

Of course we have diverse political views, so sometimes we find ourselves skirting those topics just like many families around the country. In many ways, those of us who work at the observatory are like a family, bound by a common passion for exploring and understanding the universe around us. Moving that mission forward is one of the things that makes working at the observatory on a holiday worthwhile.

Then again, working at a ground-based observatory, we’re subject to the wiles of the weather and this holiday weekend has proven to be a stormy one. Times like this do give us awesome sunsets like the one above, but not much time looking at the stars. We had rain, fog, and wind gusting upwards of 70 miles per hour. These are not conditions one should subject precision scientific instrumentation to. So, why do I have to hang around on nights like this?

First and foremost, there’s the chance the weather may improve enough for us to open. In fact, on my first two nights of this shift, even though the weather looked hopelessly bad, we did manage to get about two hours of data each night when the weather calmed and dried out briefly. Another reason I have to be available is that some of the instrumentation will be damaged if we lose power. On a remote mountaintop in the Arizona desert with 70 mile per hour winds and rain and snow, that’s a real possibility. If power goes out and doesn’t come back before battery backups drain, I may have to jump into action to start an emergency generator. What’s more, we have had circumstances where the weather has damaged buildings and I may need to take action to protect the telescopes or instrumentation.

Fortunately, our buildings and power systems are designed well enough, I don’t have to spend my entire night actually saving the telescope. So, while I’m waiting to see if my services are needed, I get a chance to do some proofreading. This weekend, I’m proofreading the novel Upstart Mystique by Don Braden, which my company Hadrosaur Productions will be publishing in early 2020. It’s a great science fiction novel about a group of colonists who are pulled off course and are forced to land on a planet they didn’t intend to settle before their ship is destroyed. The novel explores fascinating questions about human and machine intelligence.

I became a writer because I love to read. Hadrosaur Productions exists, in part, as a way to give back. The company allows me to seek out writers whose voices deserve to be heard and bring their books to readers. I know many people who read this blog are fans of my writing, but I encourage you to check out the works of the other people I publish as well. This holiday season, I’m especially thankful for writers like Greg Ballan, Joy V. Smith, and David B. Riley who have given me the privilege of editing their stories and I’m thankful to all the readers who are eager to find new, exciting fiction. As we enter this holiday season, please take a look at http://www.hadrosaur.com. I bet you’ll find a good book to share with the adventuresome readers in your life.

Bubonicon 51

Bubonicon 51 will take place in Albuquerque, New Mexico this coming weekend, Friday August 23 through Sunday August 25. The guests of honor are Allen Steele, author of Arkwright, and Ursula Vernon, artist and author. The toastmaster is Darynda Jones, author of Summoned to the Thirteenth Grave. The guest artist is Greg Spalenka, who designed the logo you see in this post. The science speaker is Dr. Harrison Schmidt, the Apollo 17 astronaut, geologist, and former senator from New Mexico. The convention’s theme is “The Future is Now.” I will be there all weekend as both a guest author and a vendor. Bubonicon 51 will be held at the Albuquerque Marriott Uptown at 2101 Louisiana Boulevard. You can get more information about the convention at http://bubonicon.com.


My schedule is as follows:

Saturday, August 24

11am-noon. Main Room. Space Cowboys: Where Westerns and Space Opera Collide. Malcolm Reynolds hauled cattle on his spaceship. Captain Harlock strode through batwing doors into a few dusty saloons. Captain Kirk’s show was originally described as “Wagon Train to the Stars.” And then there’s the animated BraveStarr. At what point does the hero of a space opera become a space cowboy? How “retro” can you make your space opera before it becomes fantasy or steampunk? I’ll be moderating this panel that includes such luminaries as Robert E. Vardeman, Craig Butler, Susan Matthews, and Allen Steele.

4-5pm. Salon A-D. Surveying the Universe. Traditionally, astronomers made a hypothesis, applied for time on telescopes, took their data and examined it. That model is being replaced by large scale surveys being conducted by organizations such as the Department of Energy and NASA. What are the advantages and disadvantages of doing astronomy, and science in general, by large scale survey as opposed to small teams working on their own questions? I’ll be moderating this panel which includes John Barnes, Loretta Hall, Kathy Kitts, and Cathy Plesko.

5:25-6:40pm. Main Room. Mass Autographing. All the Bubonicon guests will be happy to sign your books, art, or whatever you happen to bring. If it has the property of mass, I’ll do my best to sign it!

Sunday, August 25

2:45-3:30pm. Salon A-D. 45 minutes with David Lee Summers. I will read from my recent work. I’m thinking a sample of the revised version of The Pirates of Sufiro, but I may include a surprise or two if there’s time.


If you’re in Albuquerque this coming weekend, I hope you’ll drop by Bubonicon and check out a few of the many panels going on over the course of the weekend. Please drop into the “flea market” where Hadrosaur Productions will be set up. You can preview our wares, or shop online, at: http://www.hadrosaur.com.

Armageddon’s Son

I’m proud to announce the release of the latest novel from Hadrosaur Productions: Armageddon’s Son by Greg Ballan. In the novel, the forces of Light and Dark wage war on and above Earth as each side seeks human allies to advance either the destruction or salvation of an ignorant mankind. In one bold, desperate act, an agent of Chaos has stolen the most powerful and coveted holy relic from the very heart of Vatican City, The Ruby Crucifix of Christ. This powerful relic was carved from the very cross where the savior was nailed, and is stained with His blood. This holy relic is said to be the instrument to end Armageddon and herald a new age of Man.

Ex-CIA Agent Erik Knight is recruited to assist his mentor, Martin Denton, in discovering the identity of the mysterious thief and locate the stolen relic. The agents soon realize the clergy of Vatican City have secrets and political schemes surpassing even Washington DC’s politicians. In order to solve the mystery, the agents must break through the papal code of silence and accept that the world as they know it is mere illusion, hiding a brutal physical and spiritual war of ‘Good’ versus ‘Evil’. As Erik Knight digs deeper into the mysteries of faith, he realizes his own alien ancestry is linked to biblical prophecy. Is he the fabled ‘Armageddon’s Son’?

This is the first book of Greg’s HYBRID: Ethereal War duology. The first book is a taut suspense thriller with supernatural chills lurking in the background and manipulating events. In the second book, Battle Lines, Greg ramps up the supernatural action as Erik Knight takes the war to those who threaten his family. When Greg submitted Armageddon’s Son to me, I finished and immediately asked to see the next book and I blew right through it. We’ll be publishing the second part of the duology this fall.

The character of Erik Knight should be familiar to readers of Greg Ballan. He appeared in two other novels, Hybrid and Hybrid: Forced Vengeance. The two novels are published by Lachesis Publishing, which has been one of my long-time publishers. I read both of the earlier Hybrid novels and loved them. They tell the story of how Erik Knight learns that that he’s an alien-human hybrid with superhuman powers. Unfortunately, Lachesis recently decided not to accept new novels, but I thought it would be a shame not to see the second two Hybrid novels published. You don’t need to read the first two novels to leap into Armageddon’s Son, but I do highly recommend them. Hybrid and Hybrid: Forced Vengeance are both only 99 cents in ebook format at Amazon.

You can get Hybrid at: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0041KKLLI/

Hybrid: Forced Vengeance is available at: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005CBX1R6/

You can get Armageddon’s Son in print at Amazon.

You can get the ebook of Armageddon’s Son at:

A New Look for the Hadrosaur Website

Hadrosaur Productions is currently working on several new projects. We recently released my new book, Firebrandt’s Legacy, along with Fallen Angel by David B. Riley. We plan to release the exciting novel Armageddon’s Son by Greg Ballan later this month and Sheila Hartney tells me we’re currently getting some great submissions for our anthology Exchange Students. We’re also branching out and collaborating with Seelie Studios on an audio adaptation of Firebrandt’s Legacy and we have even more exciting things in discussion that I’m not at liberty to talk about yet. Because of this growth and because technologies are changing and more and more people browse the web on their mobile devices, we realized it was time to give our website an upgrade.

The goal of the new site was to create a clean layout that’s easy to navigate and understand. We have the updated logo Laura Givens designed for the company that appears on all our recent releases. New books are featured on the front page. The store link will take you to a page that shows all of our titles. Each book is now given its own unique page, which makes it easier to search for and allows authors and others to easily link to favorite books.

The new site is still something of a work in progress. The long-term goal is to put all of the books and their related data into a database which can be queried and to allow custom searches of our products. Right now, the “store” page is just a hard-coded page showing all of our products, but we know this will likely get unwieldy as our product line grows.

Much of the credit for site’s new look goes to my daughter, Autumn Summers, who went over the old site with a critical eye and re-coded much of the site into a more mobile friendly version. In order to add pages, this means I’ve had to learn the hypertext preprocessor language, PHP. Now that she’s gainfully employed as a software engineer, it’s hard to say whether she will have time to continue site development, but she has given me a solid leg up and helped me learn new skills.

People familiar our displays at conventions know that I not only carry books published by Hadrosaur Productions, but books I’ve written or edited for other presses. We used to list these books on the site, but decided in this upgrade to focus on products that actually carry the Hadrosaur Productions imprint. Again, when we develop the database capability, we’ll likely expand our offerings to include all the books we carry at conventions.

As always, if you purchase one of the books I’ve written from the Hadrosaur Productions site, I’m always happy to autograph it for your before it’s sent out. Just place your order, then go to the “Contact” page and send a message letting me know that you would like the book signed and if you would like it personalized, or if you just want a signature. Allow a little extra time to receive a signed book because my observatory schedule sometimes keeps me from being right there as orders come in.

So, what are you waiting for? Go to http://www.hadrosaur.com and browse the store. I bet you’ll find some great books to read this spring and summer. What’s more, many of the books are available for only half the cover price!

Sufiro Through the Years

2019 marks two important milestone anniversaries. 25 years ago, Kumie Wise, William Grother, and I formed Hadrosaur Productions. That same year saw the publication of my first novel, The Pirates of Sufiro, in audio form.

Hadrosaur Productions was founded to be a multimedia company, publishing books, producing audio books, and ultimately producing video projects. To prove the concept, I gathered a bunch of co-workers from Kitt Peak National Observatory and we recorded my first novel. I edited the audio recordings on primitive audio software and then had the master tapes duplicated. My wife and I took these around to science fiction conventions in Arizona and New Mexico and sold them at our first dealer’s tables. I have fond memories of these times since it was my introduction to fandom and response to this audio edition was generally positive. Looking back, fans liked seeing other fans get together and create something like this. As you can see the artwork is simple. It’s just a drawing of Captain Firebrandt, First Mate Roberts, and Suki ready to face life on the planet Sufiro. I drew the illustration. I also drew the Hadrosaur logo that would be the company logo for many years. As you’ll notice, I credited myself as “Dave L. Summers.” My name is common enough, I was looking for a way to set myself apart and I liked the way Dave L. Summers flowed off the tongue.

In 1995, I attended a writer’s conference at the University of Arizona where Ray Bradbury was the keynote speaker. An agent was also slated to attend and attendees were invited to send her their manuscripts. I sent mine and she agreed to represent it. The upshot is that she placed the book with a publisher and ultimately the mass market edition of The Pirates of Sufiro was released. As it turns out, Roberts never had a first name before this edition. The editor gave him the name Carter. I liked it well enough that I let it become canon. The cover of this edition features what appears to be simple stock art of a spaceship and a planet. The ship really doesn’t look like anything in the book, but I didn’t have a strong objection because it said “science fiction” and looked more professional than my line drawing. I’m also credited as “David L. Summers” here, the only time I used my name as I use it in scientific publications. Alas, my agent and my publisher both proved to be scam artists who worked to separate authors from their money. I never saw a dime from this edition other than from copies I sold myself and I ultimately had to go to court to get my publishing rights back. Still my experience wasn’t all bad. This edition did turn up on the shelves of the New Mexico State University Bookstore and Waldenbooks at the local mall and they even invited me to do a book signing. I also got a nice half-page write up about the book in the Las Cruces Sun-News.

Print on demand publishing was starting to get off the ground about the time I got my rights back. At that point, I had also gotten acquainted with several artists through my work editing Hadrosaur Tales Magazine. I hired Jeff Ward to do a cover for a new edition I would publish through Xlibris. This is the first professional cover for the book where I had full control of what appeared. Prominent on the cover are the faces of Captain Firebrandt and his grandson, Commander John Mark Ellis. At the bottom of the image is Firebrandt’s daughter, Suki Carter Firebrandt. She stands in front of Ward’s version of the Firebrandt homestead. Jeff has since gone on to do covers for such venues as Apex Magazine and the SFWA Bulletin. This version would only be used for four years. At that point, another cover artist I knew and worked with, Nick Johns, introduced me to one of his other clients, LBF Books. This edition is also the first one to credit me with the name I have used for most of my writing career: David Lee Summers. At this point, search engines existed and I looked long and hard to see which version of my name was relatively unique and wouldn’t be confused with a plethora of other David Summerses. I ultimately decided on my full, legal name. To me it sounded like a name a writer would use.

In 2004, Jacqueline Druga of LBF Books read and loved my newest novel, Vampires of the Scarlet Order. She asked what else I had and I mentioned The Pirates of Sufiro and its sequel Children of the Old Stars. Jackie asked to read them. She loved them and offered me a contract. Around that same time, I met artist Laura Givens at MileHiCon in Denver, Colorado and she asked if I knew any publishers looking for cover art. I introduced her to Nick and Jackie and they soon started working together. One of Laura’s first covers for LBF would be her cover for The Pirates of Sufiro. We decided to take the idea I had for the Xlibris cover and expand it across the series. The Pirates of Sufiro would feature Captain Firebrandt on the planet next to the homestead. Suki Firebrandt would appear on the cover of Children of the Old Stars in a habitat dome on Titan. John Mark Ellis would appear on the cover of the as-yet unwritten Heirs of the New Earth. For this version, Laura created what I now consider to be the iconic Firebrandt. In many ways, he bears a strong resemblance to the version I had way back in my first crude drawing on the cassette tape version.

Laura’s cover has been canonical for over ten years. When I re-envisioned the series as a four-book series called the Space Pirates’ Legacy, Laura improved on her iconic image of Captain Firebrandt for the new Book One, Firebrandt’s Legacy. So, it was natural that I would ask Laura to create the cover for the 25th Anniversary Edition of The Pirates of Sufiro. She has done so and I have to say, the newest version is the best yet. Come back on Saturday as I unveil the newest cover for an all-new and improved visit to the planet Sufiro.

2019 Hadrosaur Books

New Year’s Eve is a time for resolutions and making plans for the coming year. I thought this might be a great time to take a look ahead and see what books we have planned for release in 2019.

We will kick things off with my own book, Firebrandt’s Legacy. This short story collection follows an arc of tales about space pirate, Captain Ellison Firebrandt. These can be read as individual short stories or as an episodic novel.  Ellison Firebrandt fights the good fight for Earth. Under a letter of marque, he raids the ships of Earth’s opponents, slowing down their progress and ability to compete with the home system. On the planet Epsilon Indi 2, he rescues a woman named Suki Mori from a drug lord, only to find she isn’t so happy about living a pirate’s life. However, when the captain finds a new engine that will make him the most successful pirate of all, Suki is the only one who can make it work. Now Firebrandt must find a way to keep his crew fed and his ship supplied while relying on a woman who barely trusts him and while every government in the galaxy hunts him to get the engine back! This book has been created with generous support from my Patreon supporters and we’re now working on a revision of my first novel featuring Captain Firebrandt, The Pirates of Sufiro. You can join the crew and get great perks and early news at http://www.patreon.com/davidleesummers.

I’m also very excited to be publishing two novels by Greg Ballan titled Armageddon’s Son and Battle Lines. These novels are set in the world of Greg’s thrilling Hybrid series and tell the story of how Erik Knight, a former CIA operative who gained tremendous powers from a long gone alien race, gets embroiled in a cosmic war between good and evil. Armageddon’s Son starts off when the forces of evil capture an ancient artifact which is said to be the relic that will trigger the very rapture itself. Erik must recover this relic while fighting demons who not only threaten himself, but his family. In the process, Erik learns disturbing truths about his only son. In Battle Lines, Erik takes the war to the demons and fights for the future of his son and the Earth itself.

Our fourth book is a novella from David B. Riley called Fallen Angel. This novel is set in the same world as David’s novella, The Venerable Travels of Ling Fung, and tells the story of Mabel, an angel from hell who accompanies General Grant’s army during the last days of the Civil War only to discover that Martians are watching the Earth with envious eyes and slowly drawing their plans against us. Not only that, but Mabel has to contend with her evil sister, Kevin, who wants to have humans for dinner. Although Mabel and Grant get the upper hand before the war ends, the battle of good against evil isn’t won so quickly. Several years later, in San Francisco, Mabel just wants to have fun with her friend Miles O’Malley, when she discovers Kevin and the Martians have joined forces with a fraternity at U.C. Berkeley. You can get your hands on David’s other book with Hadrosaur by visiting http://hadrosaur.com/bookstore.html#Dragon-Cowboys.

Our fifth book of the year depends on those of you out there reading this post. That’s our anthology, Exchange Students. We’ll start reading for that book in February. Remember, you can find the guidelines at: http://hadrosaur.com/ExchangeStudents-gl.html.

Here’s wishing you and yours a joyous and prosperous 2019.

Anthology Announcement: Exchange Students

I’m excited to announce that on February 1, Hadrosaur Productions will begin reading for a new anthology with the working title, Exchange Students, which will be edited by Sheila Hartney.  I thought this would be a great time for Sheila to tell us a little about herself and how she got the idea for the anthology. I will share the link to the anthology guidelines at the end of the post.


I started reading science fiction as soon as I learned to read. When I was a little girl in Utica, NY, the room that held science fiction books was off-limits to little kids, so I had to sneak in when a librarian was turned the other way and then hope some kind librarian would actually let me check the books out. Otherwise I had to persuade my older brother to check the books out on his card. That same brother belonged to the Science Fiction Book Club back in the 1950s and early 60s, and tried to keep me from reading his books by putting them on a high shelf he thought I couldn’t reach. He was wrong. I figured out how to reach it.

I attended Jim Gunn’s short story workshop in Lawrence, Kansas, and from it came my Writer’s of the Future story, “Kidswap”. Over the years I’ve attended other workshops, notably the Taos Toolbox, and the one that came along with being a Writer of the Future. Chris McKitteridge, who has taken over from Gunn was in my workshop. In the service of name-dropping, Fred Pohl was a guest instructor back when I took it.

The job that has had the most impact on who I am is that for ten years I was a ticket agent at National Airport in Washington, DC. It was an enormously difficult and stressful job much of the time, but it taught me to think on my feet (literally, as I stood for eight hours in high heels on a concrete floor), to solve seemingly unsolvable problems, and best of all it came with free travel. I got to see the world.

I am not sure how much my own love of science fiction was an influence, but my son is in a PhD program in astronomy.

Currently I live in Santa Fe, NM. The amazing clear night skies are perhaps the best thing about living here. A close second is that so many science fiction writers live here or very near here, and I count any number of them as friends. I even got to see last year’s eclipse with one well known writer.

Like a lot of writers I’ve worked at a variety of jobs: paralegal, retail, temp office work, nurse’s aid. I worked at an art gallery here in Santa Fe for two and a half days and then was fired for “unbridled exuberance”. Yeah, really. I also ran for office once. The Kansas State House. You can probably guess that I lost, but it was a fascinating and educational thing to have done.

So far as hobbies go, I crochet and embroider, and of course read a lot. Half or a bit more of what I read is non fiction, and I’m especially entranced by epidemiology, earth science in all forms (earthquakes, volcanoes, continental drift), genetics and human evolution, dinosaurs, the list goes on.

My favorite authors at present are James Van Pelt, a fabulous short story writer and nice guy, and Connie Willis, a fantastic writer of novels and perhaps the sharpest and funniest person I’ve ever known.

As for the Exchange Students idea, one of my relatives wrote a story that referenced an exchange student from ancient Rome, which immediately struck me as a great idea and I asked if I could steal it. They said yes, of course, and I wrote a short story which goes by the title “Exchange Student”. In generating ideas for a possible anthology, the exchange student idea was always there.


I hope you’re as excited about the prospect of the Exchange Students anthology as I am! Now, be sure to check out the guidelines and start thinking about the tale you want to tell about an exchange student of the past, present, future, or across dimensions. http://hadrosaur.com/ExchangeStudents-gl.html