Astronomy on Independence Day

I spent my Independence Day this week in the operator’s chair at the Mayall 4-meter telescope at Kitt Peak. Astronomers typically work every single clear night, regardless of weekends or holidays. I’ve worked during many Thanksgivings, Memorial Days, Presidents’ Days and more. In particular, I was supporting a project looking at stars with planets or planet candidates identified by the Kepler Space Probe and getting spectra of them. Spectra tell us things like the chemical composition of the star and the temperature, which in turn helps us know whether any planets discovered are potentially habitable.

4meter Console

Basically, when operating the 4-meter, I spend the night at the console shown above. It’s not as colorful as watching a fireworks show, but it’s still pretty thrilling to point the telescope at faint stars, then take a glimmer of light, spread it out through a spectrograph, and understand an object that’s hundreds or even thousands of light years away.

Quiet nights at the telescope can be a good time for reflection and on this weekend after Independence Day I do find myself privileged to be an American. I’m fascinated by the history of this great land, and I’ve turned to expressing that fascination through my steampunk writing. That said, I recognize this country is far from perfect and its leaders have made more than their share of mistakes, but one of the things that makes America great is perhaps that it’s easier to correct those mistakes here than it is in other countries. We’re still generally free to form our own opinions and express them.

I express my thoughts and explore ideas through my writing. Recently I came across a review of one of my books, claiming I was clearly a member of a certain political party because of some remarks a character made. It left me scratching my head. Sure, if a character expresses an idea, it’s something I’ve thought about, but my character and I may have very different outlooks. What’s more, even if I do share an opinion about one subject with a political party, it doesn’t mean I agree with others.

If there’s one thing that concerns me about America today, it’s a tendency to view things along very polarized party lines. If a person believes A, they must by necessity believe B,C, and D also. The truth is that like starlight, there’s a whole spectrum of ideas.

As the fireworks fade and light shows end this weekend after Independence Day, I encourage you to form your own opinions and take constructive action when you see a need for a change. Don’t be afraid to disagree with a friend and remember you can still be friends even if you disagree. I think that’s a viewpoint most of the protagonists in my novels and stories would agree with and it summarizes why this country really is so great.