Space Pirates’ Legacy Update, March 2021

Children of the Old Stars

This month marks the third anniversary of the re-release of The Solar Sea, which is the prequel to my Space Pirates’ Legacy series. I’m also nearing completion of updates to Children of the Old Stars, which is book three of the series in its current incarnation. I thought this was a good moment to take stock of where I am in this project and look ahead at what’s left to accomplish.

The Space Pirates’ Legacy series was originally released by LBF Books as the Old Star/New Earth series. The series consisted of The Pirates of Sufiro, Children of the Old Stars, and Heirs of the New Earth. The series title was something quickly cobbled together from the last two books. My publisher billed The Solar Sea as book four of the series. However, as I mentioned before, it’s more a prequel to the series and a standalone story. It’s been released as such in its current incarnation.

After the books of the Old Star/New Earth series had been released, I wrote several short stories about pirate captain Ellison Firebrandt and his crew before they are stranded on the planet Sufiro. I decided to put those stories together with new material and, once the rights to the other books in the series reverted to me, I decided Firebrandt’s Legacy was a logical, new first book in the series. I also decided to give the series a catchier name. Long before I came up with the name “The Space Pirates’ Legacy” series, I’d been referring to the Old Star/New Earth series as my legacy series because it was my first series published. Thing is, there actually is a space ship called the Legacy in these books and it has a prominent role in three of the four novels. What’s more, as you might imagine with books called “Children” and “Heirs” these are books about the heirs to the original space pirates. Space Pirates’ Legacy suddenly seemed like a good fit.

Firebrandt’s Legacy

Back in May 2020, Lynn Moorer of the radio show “All About Books” interviewed me about the new first book in the series. In this universe, most ships have to jump to speeds greater than light at gravitational nodal points near stars. An important element of Firebrandt’s Legacy is how pirate captain Ellison Firebrandt lays his hands on a special kind of engine that allows him to jump to speeds faster than light without jump points. In her interview, Lynn asked me about the drives and how they work, plus she had me read some excerpts from the novel. The interview is archived on the Las Cruces Community Radio site at: https://www.lccommunityradio.org/archives/all-about-books-david-lee-summers9615141

I assembled Firebrandt’s Legacy with the help of my Patreon supporters. Each month, I shared one of the stories from the novel along with some commentary about how it fit in the story arc I was assembling, then shared the finished, polished chapter. Overall, I ended up with a book that pleased me. Once the novel was finished, I took my Patreon supporters on a deep dive as I tore my novel The Pirates of Sufiro apart and put it back together again. I shared each chapter as it originally appeared along with commentary about the chapter, then I shared the revised chapter. The Pirates of Sufiro was the first novel I ever wrote and it took quite a bit of work to bring it up to the standard of Firebrandt’s Legacy. Still, I think I succeeded and I believe The Pirates of Sufiro now works as a strong follow-up to Firebrandt’s Legacy.

The Pirates of Sufiro

Lynn Moorer interviewed me about The Pirates of Sufiro last month. This time, her interview focused on both the characters and the gadgets the characters used. She had me read three excerpts from the novel. You can listen to this new interview at: https://www.lccommunityradio.org/archives/all-about-books-david-lee-summers8108468

About a year ago, as I was wrapping up the first pass of The Pirates of Sufiro with my Patreon subscribers, I re-read the last two novels of the series. I didn’t feel those novels needed as much work as Pirates, but they still needed some work. In Children of the Old Stars, Ellison Firebrandt’s grandson, John Mark Ellis goes on a quest and seeks help from a warrior named Arepno. I felt like Arepno’s teachings needed to be fleshed out. The novel’s quest involves understanding an alien called the Cluster. Children of the Old Stars was probably my most “seat of the pants” novel. I didn’t outline. I didn’t work out exactly what the Cluster was beforehand, I just started writing until I came to what I thought was a satisfactory conclusion to the quest, which then created bigger problems and lead us into the final novel of the series. Looking back at it, I realized I needed more hints in Children of the Old Stars about what the Cluster really was.

At this point, I expect to wrap up Children of the Old Stars by early May. Once it’s complete, I’ll set a release date and format the novel for publication. I’ll give it one more proofread to assure that it’s still internally consistent. The novel should be out by this summer. Once that’s finished, I’ll turn my attention the final novel in the series, Heirs of the New Earth. This final novel doesn’t need as much work as the others in the series. I’m not certain yet whether I’ll give it the same “deep dive” as the other novels in the series. What I do know is that my patrons at Patreon will get the first look at the new edition and I’ll be discussing the process of its creation with them. If you’d like to join us, you can sign on at https://www.patreon.com/davidleesummers

Celebration in Isolation

In my post one week ago, I mentioned that my family was celebrating numerous anniversaries and milestones. It should come as no surprise that these celebrations had to be adjusted in the wake of restrictions imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic. Still, we did our best to mark the occasions in a suitable fashion.

Before I continue, I note that as I write this, the death toll from COVID-19 approaches 100,000 in the United States. I’m very sorry for those who have lost loved ones at this difficult time. At the same time, I’m grateful to all those who take social distancing guidelines seriously so that we don’t find ourselves in an even worse situation.

Last week, my wife and I celebrated our thirtieth wedding anniversary. Looking it up on line, the thirtieth is the Pearl Anniversary. Because my wife and I are fans of Mystery Science Theater 3000, this brought to mind Dr. Pearl Forrester, the evil genius who sent cheesy movies to the Satellite of Love during the show’s SyFy Channel years. With this in mind, my wife and I decided to get each other Mystery Science Theater 3000-themed gifts. We ended up getting the two Netflix seasons of the show along with a 1000-piece puzzle to work on together.

Although it wasn’t technically an anniversary present, the same day as the puzzle and movies arrived in the mail, my wife bought me the code to upgrade my copy of Microsoft Word to the 2019 version. I discovered that the software has a feature that will read the text to you. I’ve long been an advocate for reading your own work aloud when you edit, but this is a nice additional tool. It has already helped me find unintended commas or wrong words in documents I’ve edited. This looks like a nice feature for an author to add to their toolkit and I likely will say more once I gain more experience with it.

Normally we would go out to dinner for our anniversary, and while there are some restaurants opening up with some seating, we decided this wasn’t the time to do that. We grilled steaks for our anniversary and then ordered a to-go meal from one of our favorite restaurants two day later when our daughter graduated from high school.

Las Cruces High School held a “drive-thru” graduation. Parents drove the graduating seniors through the line in cars. My daughter wanted me to drive her through in my Smart Car with its airship pirate logos. A masked and gloved staff member handed out the papers and flowers. I drove the car, so this marked the first time I went through a graduation procession since my own university graduation.

I wrapped up last week with another interview at Las Cruces Community Radio Station 101.5FM KTAL-LP. “All About Books” host Lynn Moorer interviewed me about my novel Firebrandt’s Legacy. Even though this was an in-studio interview, we maintained good social distancing. We sat well over 6-feet apart and she made sure to clean the chair and microphone I used. In the interview, Lynn was especially interested in the jumps ships in my universe use to move faster than the speed of light. My means of faster-than-light travel was an idea I came up with while studying General Relativity in grad school at New Mexico Tech. You may listen to the entire interview at: https://www.lccommunityradio.org/archives/all-about-books-david-lee-summers9615141

You can learn more about the novel, read a sample chapter, and find out where you can obtain a copy of your own at: http://davidleesummers.com/Firebrandts-Legacy.html

Que tal?

This past Friday, I was interviewed live on Las Cruces Community Radio Station, KTAL-LP 101.5FM, by Lynn Moorer for her show “Book Talk.” The station’s call letters were picked deliberately to evoke the Spanish phrase, “Que tal?” which means “What’s happening?” I mention this at the outset not just because it’s fun trivia, but because language ended up being a big theme of the interview. Unfortunately, the interview wasn’t recorded, so I can’t share a link with you, but I can share some highlights from the conversation.

The interview focused on my novel, The Brazen Shark, book three of my Clockwork Legion series. Like all of my series novels, I endeavor to make them stand alone and Lynn indicated she had no problem diving in. She was extremely well organized, with pages of notes and questions, plus her copy of the book had numerous passages marked. She did note that she hasn’t read much science fiction or alternate history. That aspect proved more of a challenge for her, but she clearly followed the book’s story and was captivated by its themes.

In the interview, Lynn asked me to give a broad description of the book. I described it as the story of a honeymoon gone quite wrong in 1877, Ramon and Fatemeh Morales have just been married and their friend, Captain Cisneros has taken them on a vacation to Hawaii. When business calls the captain to Japan, they decide to accompany him rather than staying behind. Once they get to Japan, they find themselves embroiled in a plot by samurai to steal a Russian airship and foment war between Japan and Russia.

It was clear from the interview that Lynn was especially fascinated by the character of Legion. Legion started life as an organic being who uploaded his consciousness into a computer. Over the years, that computer evolved and upgraded itself until it became a swarm of discrete elements that can travel at will through space. In the interview, we discussed how Legion saw humans as younger versions of himself. When we meet Legion in the first novel, Owl Dance, he’s not especially emotional. He embarks on an experiment to unify humanity. By The Brazen Shark, his time among humans has awaken his emotions and he feels a certain tenderness toward us and he realizes that there’s a danger that interference may have harmed us as a species.

Lynn also liked the idea that Legion could understand people’s thoughts and translate them for other people. In effect, Legion acts as a real-time translator, breaking down the barriers between people. As I pointed out in the interview, I see language as a window into culture, so Legion’s observations help the reader understand the disparate cultures in the novel as well as helping the characters understand each other.

Another aspect of the book Lynn highlighted was the role of women in the novel. Imagawa, Ipokash, and Fatemeh all have talents that arguably exceed their closest male counterparts. I did this deliberately when I wrote the novel. The late nineteenth century was a time when women stood up for their rights. It was the era of women’s suffrage and the era of women taking prominent roles in academia. I wanted strong, but believable women to be a hallmark of the novel.

The novel is available locally in Las Cruces at COAS Books on Main Street. It’s also available through Amazon.