Scarlet Order Showcase

When Chaz Kemp created new artwork for my Scarlet Order novels earlier this year, he brought my characters to life in a whole new way. Within the novels, the vampires keep journals, drink coffee, and generally enjoy their immortal existence. I wanted to celebrate these characters and Chaz’s portrayal in a way that wouldn’t hide on the bookshelf. So, with his permission, I created a small line of products featuring the Scarlet Order Vampires.

Show your love for the Scarlet Order Vampires!

Modern print-on-demand companies will allow you to print a design on almost everything ranging from T-shirts and underwear to clocks and wall art. Also, the products cost a bit more than comparable mass-market retail items. So, when I set out to design these products, I decided to design things I would actually use and enjoy, so I kept it simple. That said, if someone reading this has a Scarlet Order product they would like to see that I didn’t design, by all means let me know and I’ll see if I can make it happen!

The first thing I knew I wanted to create were some coffee mugs. When I wrote Vampires of the Scarlet Order, I decided the one thing that would make an immortal existence truly intolerable would be the inability to enjoy a good cup of coffee or tea, so I allowed the vampires in my world to enjoy liquids, even if they could no longer enjoy solid food. Here are the mugs I designed.

The mug with Daniel reads: “I sipped a cup of coffee, trying to stimulate the old blood in my veins.” Draco’s mug reminds us that “We are transcendent creatures of mysterious origin.” The mug with Marcella reads: “When one becomes a vampire, one expects to encounter some strange shit.”

Because Vampires of the Scarlet Order is very much an epistolary novel, I thought it would be appropriate to have some notebooks inspired by the characters.

We have “The Journal of Dr. Jane Heckman” and “The Notebook of Daniel McKee.”

I also created a set of buttons, because these can be fun to wear in almost any casual occasion and are a great way to show off your favorite Scarlet Order Vampire.

Finally, because I’m on the road a lot, I love a good travel mug. What’s more, the overall cover layouts are so nice, I wanted to find a way to use the whole thing. I realized the two Scarlet Order covers fit nicely back to back on a travel mug. So if you don’t have a favorite Scarlet Order vampire, you can always get all of the ones who appear on the covers in one convenient package! Here is the front and back of the mug:

All of the Scarlet Order products are listed in my eBay store at: https://www.ebay.com/sch/hadrosaur_productions/m.html

My print provider has only recently started offering to post products to eBay and I’ve helped them debug some issues with the connection. I think it’s working pretty reliably now, but if for some reason you see something here that you would like, but it’s showing as “sold out” at eBay, please use the contact link at http://hadrosaur.com/ and let us know. We should be able to help you get the product you’re looking for.

The Vampire Lovers

In my story “Fountains of Blood” that appears in the anthology Straight Outta Tombstone, the vampire Marcella hands the protagonist, Billy, a copy of J. Sheridan LeFanu’s 1872 novella Carmilla to help him understand what vampires are. I used Carmilla partly because the story my story is centered around the 1896 Albert Fountain disappearance and Dracula was still a year away from publication. I also chose it because I thought this story of a female vampire would resonate well with my vampire character, Marcella.

Because Carmilla predates Dracula, it does not contain many of the tropes we often associate with vampires. Like many vampires of folklore, Carmilla has ghost-like qualities. She can move through locked doors and haunt people’s dreams. If she’s bothered by religious iconography, LeFanu doesn’t say. I have wondered if any good films were made of LeFanu’s story and I recently discovered that Hammer Studios produced one in 1970 under the title The Vampire Lovers. Just to note, the poster reproduced on the Blu-Ray case does not reflect the film’s content. We never see a hapless male victim chained up and being ravaged by a horde of female vampires.

Overall, the film is remarkably faithful to LeFanu’s novella. The story is more linear. The novella opens when a carriage topples. The passengers prove to be Carmilla and her mother. The mother pleads with an English gentleman to allow Carmilla to rest and recover while she continues her journey. The gentleman agrees and Carmilla enters his home where she seduces the gentleman’s daughter, Laura. Over time, Laura begins to succumb to a mysterious illness. Later, we learn that a similar incident happened in the home of General Spielsdorf when Carmilla, then calling herself Millarca, seduces his ward Bertha. Over time, Bertha grows pale and weak and eventually dies. In the movie, we see the incident in General Spielsdorf’s house first followed by the second incident. For some reason, the filmmakers named General Spielsdorf’s ward Laura and gave the second young lady the name Emma.

That noted, there are more than a couple of superficial changes. For some reason, we get a lot more men in the filmed version. There’s a male vampire overseeing the Countess and Carmilla. There’s a love interest for Emma who comes riding to the rescue at the end, although he doesn’t seem to do much else in the film. The characters of Madame Perrodon and Mademoiselle De LeFontaine from the novella are combined into the character of “Mademoiselle Perrodon” and a male butler is introduced. What’s more, at the ending of the Victorian novella, Laura, Madame Perrodone and Mademoiselle De LeFontaine are all out hunting the vampire with General Spielsdorf and Laura’s father. In the movie, Emma is wasting away at home while the men are out hunting.

Carmilla is very much a story of a female vampire seducing young women and it feels like the filmmakers in 1970 were trying to imply that the victims needed real men to both defend them and show them how much better love would be with a man. It’s interesting to see that the Victorian author didn’t do this, though LeFanu often nods and winks to his audience telling us how scandalous the women’s behavior is.

If you’re as fascinated by vampire stories as I am, you definitely should not miss Carmilla. It’s a short read and available for free at Project Gutenberg. The movie is also worth a watch and features notable performances by Ingrid Pitt as Carmilla, Peter Cushing as General Spielsdorf, and Kate O’Mara as Mademoiselle Perrodon. Be aware this is the era when Hammer started undressing its female leads at any opportunity, so if that offends, you might want to skip this film. If you want to know more about my vampires and the history of Marcella, be sure to read Vampires of the Scarlet Order. You can find more details and the first chapter at: http://www.davidleesummers.com/VSO.html.

Twisting History

This month has started off with some good news. I have official word that my story “Fountains of Blood” has been accepted for an anthology called Straight Outta Tombstone tentatively scheduled to appear in summer 2017 from Baen Books. Editor David Boop invited me to submit to the anthology a little over a year ago.

fountain

My story idea came quickly and I was inspired by a tombstone in the cemetery behind my house. No one’s buried underneath this tombstone. Rather it’s a memorial to a former cavalryman, governor of Texas, and attorney named Albert Jennings Fountain who disappeared near White Sands along with his son Henry on February 1, 1896. Among other things, Fountain operated the Fountain Opera House in Mesilla, New Mexico. Although that building no longer stands, his family rebuilt the building in 1905 as the Fountain Theater, which now shows films selected by the Mesilla Valley Film Society. As it tuns out, for a time they used stationary with a letterhead I designed for them, giving me a thread of connection back to Fountain himself.

Perhaps Fountain’s most famous client as an attorney was Billy the Kid. Most sources cite Billy’s real name as William Henry McCarty. In my Clockwork Legion novels, William McCarty’s life path is changed when he encounters Ramon Morales and Fatemeh Karimi. Instead of getting caught up in an ugly feud known as the Lincoln County War, McCarty becomes one of the Owl Riders, helping to defend the United States against the Russians.

Brazen Shark-300x450

Back in our timeline, after defending Billy the Kid, Fountain would go on to launch an investigation into the Lincoln County War. He was on his way home from Lincoln County when he and his son disappeared. In The Brazen Shark, Fountain still defends Billy. This time it’s not for murder, but for helping his friends Ramon and Fatemeh evade soldiers so they could understand why the Russians were invading the United States in the first place. In the Clockwork Legion series, Billy doesn’t die at twenty-one, and Fountain hires him as a bodyguard for his fateful trip. The problem is, even Billy the Kid can’t stand up to the forces out to stop Albert J. Fountain.

After getting ambushed near White Sands and left for dead, Billy awakens and goes for help. After the long journey, he seeks solace from a “soiled dove” in Las Cruces named Marcella who turns out to know more than he would have suspected and provides Billy with essential clues about the disappearance. Those familiar with my books may recognize Marcella from Vampires of the Scarlet Order.

Of course, my short story stands alone and you will be able to read it without being familiar with my novels. However, for readers who want the fun of seeing the connections and how I’ve bent and twisted history in both universes, I recommend starting with the first books in each series Owl Dance and Dragon’s Fall: Rise of the Scarlet Order. Of course, I’d love it if you would keep right on reading all the books in the two series. That would keep you busy for the months waiting for the new anthology. I hear the author list is pretty amazing and hope I can share the full table of contents soon.