Nine to Eternity

I am pleased to announce that a new anthology has just been released featuring my novelette “An Asteroid By Any Other Name.” The anthology is called Nine to Eternity: A Science Fiction Anthology, edited by M.Christian and published by Strange Particle Press.

In M.Christian’s previous anthology, Five To The Future the editor asked respected science fiction and fantasy authors to “write whatever story you want to write. No limits aside from having fun.”

Nine To Eternity: A Science Fiction Anthology takes this idea a fascinating step further, with the editor reaching out to the same authors, plus any friends they’d personally like to invite to the project, to submit “a personal favorite story: one that also, sadly, didn’t get the love they’d put into it.”

And so Ernest Hogan, Emily Devenport, Cynthia Ward, Arthur Byron Cover, as well as M.Christian himself, from the first book are joined by newcomers Ralph Greco, Jr., Jean Marie Stine, the estate of Jody Scott, and myself to make Nine To Eternity: A Science Fiction Anthology a memorable reading experience. 

Full of not just endearing characters, vivid worlds, and thrilling adventures, this anthology is also is a touching examination of what this collection of authors considers their best work. Stories included in Nine To Eternity: A Science Fiction Anthology include:

“Skin Deep,” a wistful science fiction melody of love and longing by Emily Devenport: author of Shade, Larissa, Scorpianne, EggHeads, and The Kronos, plus many other novels and stories.

“Spitzhkov Red,” a haunting tale as real as tomorrow’s headlines of comradeship and service from Jody Scott: author of Passing For Human, I, Vampire, and Devil-May-Care (all published by Strange Particle Press).

“Bombastic Christ,” the controversial story of what happens when DNA from the Shroud of Turin is cloned, written by Ralph Greco, Jr., author of Far Out Within, and who has stories in anthologies such as The Infinite Spectacle: Short Stories of Displaced Reality.

“The Great Mars-A-Go-Go Mexican Standoff,” from the “father of Chicano sf” is a rollicking future-shock interplanetary Chicano delight by Ernest Hogan: author of High Aztech, and Cortez on Jupiter (both published by Strange Particle Press). I loved seeing this story in this book, since I published it in Tales of the Talisman as well!

“A Murder” is a lyrical, but heart-wrenching story of futuristic murder by Arthur Byron Cover author of East Wind Coming, The Platypus of Doom & Other Nihilists, and Autumn Angels (all published by Strange Particle Press).

“Whoever Fights Monsters” is a ferociously powerful reinterpretation of Mina Harker from Dracula written by Cynthia Ward, editor of anthologies like Lost Trails: Forgotten Tales of the Weird West, author of The Adventure of the Incognita Countess, and with stories in magazines like Analog, Asimov’s, and Weird Tales.

“In The Canal Zone” is a dreamlike tale about a mysterious canal whose location may not even lie within our own universe written by Jean Marie Stine editor of numerous anthologies, such as Future Eves: Great Science Fiction by Women About Women, The Legendary Women Detectives: 6 Classic Novelettes, and author of novels including Season of the Witch, and collections like Herstory & Other Science Fictions, and Nowhere To Hide And Other Mystery Stories.

“Why Are There Buildings, Daddy?,” a not-far-from-home work of spec fic about a depressed young man who only ever wanted to be a writer penned by M.Christian: the editor of 25+ anthologies, 12+ collections like Love Without Gun Control, Bachelor Machine, and others. His novels include Me2, The Very Bloody Marys, Running Dry, Finger’s Breadth, and more.

Finally, my story is “An Asteroid by Any Other Name,” a classically inspired tale of rapidly approaching doom. This is a story where I look to my astronomy background as I did when editing the anthologies A Kepler’s Dozen and Kepler’s Cowboys and writing my novel The Astronomer’s Crypt. I edited and updated the story since it first appeared in the e-zine The Fifth Di… almost fourteen years ago.

You can pick up your own copy of the anthology at: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08JHBGTJS/

The Baron and the Firebird

“I hate vampire stories!” One of my co-workers made that statement at the dinner table this week. It’s a sentiment I sometimes hear at conventions when people glance at my vampire novels without learning more about them. Of course, what they mean is that they hate the proliferation of vampire romances and it’s actually a sentiment I can appreciate, especially when the protagonist vampire is creepily stalking a girl centuries younger than himself. I read a book this week that definitely doesn’t fit that mold.

firebirdebook J. A. Campbell’s novelette The Baron and the Firebird is a vampire romance, but most definitely not one involving a vampire pretending to be a high school student. The story opens with a Russian vampire named Peter in a New York diner looking for his lost love—a woman with a beautiful voice named Zoya. A waitress at the diner suggests he try a musical that recently opened. Having nothing to lose, Peter takes her advice.

The story then flashes back to Russia in 1725. Peter, known back then as Pyotr, is a Baron managing lands. Even though he’s a vampire, he’s learned to subsist on goat’s blood so he doesn’t have to drink the blood of his subjects. Pyotr is able to walk in sunlight through the aid of magical cherries that grow in his garden. Only a small number grow in the harsh Russian winter and he parcels them out carefully because they help him to be a good and effective ruler of his land. Unfortunately, a bird has entered the orchard and has started eating the magical cherries.

This is not just any bird, but a magical firebird. Pyotr traps her. Entranced by her beauty, he builds her a bigger cage. One day, he’s surprised to find not the firebird in his cage, but a beautiful woman. He lets her out and they talk. She makes a bargain to stay a year for each cherry she ate from his garden.

As you might infer, events happen which cause them to become separated, since Pyotr is searching for her years later. I was delighted by the fairy-tale like quality of this particular vampire story. I also appreciated that this story explored the love of two immortal creatures, one of light and one of darkness. The vampire elevates himself to become better than most would expect while the firebird comes down to Earth. Campbell effectively builds tension, making us wonder whether or not the vampire and the firebird will be able to build a love that can last forever.

The Scarlet Order vampires would be pleased to make the acquaintance of Pyotr and Zoya. If you like tales of timeless romance, classic fairy tales, or just want to read a good, non-formulaic vampire tale, then The Baron and the Firebird is the book your looking for. You can pick up a copy in print or ebook format at Amazon.